SASA community mobilisation

SASA! Act now against violence

Methods:
STRIVE-associated

SASA! means ‘now!’ in Kiswahili. This comprehensive approach combines tools and a systematic process for community mobilisation to prevent violence against women and HIV. SASA! was developed by Raising Voices and is being implemented in Kampala, Uganda by the Centre for Domestic Violence Prevention (CEDOVIP). 

The SASA! Study, a cluster randomised controlled trial, assesses the impact of the SASA! programme on violence and HIV prevention. The SASA! Study is designed to measures changes in:

  • attitudes towards gender roles and norms
  • levels of intimate-partner violence (IPV)
  • HIV-related behaviours
  • community responses to violence against women.

SASA! and the SASA! study are part of a broader portfolio of research being undertake by STRIVE and the Gender, Violence and Health Centre at LSHTM. The research aims to identify effective interventions to prevent intimate partner violence, and to address gender inequality as a structural driver of HIV.

Addressing the underlying causes of HIV

SASA! takes an innovative approach to community mobilisation. Rather than providing factual information on violence and HIV risk, SASA! addresses the imbalance of power between women and men that underlies both epidemics.

SASA! is an acronym for a four-phase process:

  • Start thinking about violence against women and HIV/AIDS as interconnected issues and the need to personally address these issues
  • Raise awareness about communities’ acceptance of men’s use of power over women, which fuels HIV/AIDS and violence against women
  • Support women and men directly affected by or involved in these issues to change
  • Take action to prevent HIV/AIDS and violence against women.

Resources

Video

News

Publications

SASA! logo

SASA! is an exploration of power—what it is, who has it, how it is used, how it is abused and how power dynamics between women and men can change for the better. SASA! demonstrates how understanding power and its effects can help us prevent violence against women and HIV infection. SASA! Activist Kit