Skip to Content

Research on structural change to prevent HIV

Social forces drive the HIV epidemic and block prevention efforts. STRIVE partners investigate how structural factors create vulnerability and what programmes work to tackle them.

Projects

Maisha: Microfinance and gender training to reduce violence against women

The Maisha study addresses intimate partner violence (IPV) through microfinance and gender empowerment interventions.

Drivers: Gender inequality and violence
Methods:
Maisha: Microfinance and gender training to reduce violence against women

SASA! Act now against violence

SASA! addresses the imbalance of power between women and men that underlies gender violence and HIV risk.

Drivers: Gender inequality and violence
Methods:
SASA community mobilisation

Parivartan for Girls

Parivartan for Girls is designed to increase adolescent girls' self-esteem, self-confidence and educational aspirations through sports.

Drivers: Gender inequality and violence
Methods:
Parivartan for Girls

Phuza Wize: Creating safe drinking spaces

Phuza Wize is a campaign of STRIVE affiliate, Soul City, to reduce alcohol use and create safe drinking spaces in South Africa.

Phuza Wize: Creating safe drinking spaces

Samvedana Plus: Reducing violence and increasing condom use in the intimate partnerships of female sex workers

An intervention and evaluation study in northern Karnataka, India, Samvedana Plus seeks to understand and address this form of violence and HIV risk.

Drivers: Gender inequality and violence
Methods:
Samvedana Plus

Samata: Keeping girls in secondary school

Samata aims to reduce HIV risk among adolescent girls in Bijapur and Bagalkot Districts by increasing their rates of secondary school enrolment and completion.

Sabala on International Day of the Girl Child 2013

Modelling the influence of structural factors

Multi-level statistical modelling has helped support the growth of a movement to address the social determinants of health.

STRIVE research data

Guidelines for reducing HIV stigma in India

Globally, stigma and discrimination impede HIV prevention, testing and treatment efforts. ICRW's framework for India identifies key entry points for stigma-focused programming and measurement.

Drivers: Stigma and criminalization
Methods:

Reducing excessive alcohol use and high-risk sex

Project addressing alcohol as a structural driver of HIV risk by intervening in alcohol’s ubiquitous availability in impoverished urban areas.

Addressing alcohol as a structural driver of HIV

Parivartan: Coaching boys into men

Coaching boys into men to cultivate gender equality and reduce violence against women.

Drivers: Gender inequality and violence
Methods:
Parivartan changes gender norms through sports coaching

Swa Koteka: Cash transfers to tackle HIV among adolescents

How might cash payments reduce transactional sex, thereby reducing the risk of HIV and unwanted pregnancy among young girls? How do girls’ friendship networks affect their risk of acquiring HIV?

Swa Koteka: Cash transfers to tackle HIV among adolescents
Printer-friendly version

Resources

  • Research to inform adaptation: An IPV case study from Rwanda How do we re-implement programmes in new contexts while maintaining core goals, delivery techniques and intensity? Frequent mismatches often arise between the priority population, implementing agency and local community, and those of the original...
  • Samata intervention briefs Structural factors cut short the education of many adolescent girls belonging to scheduled caste and scheduled tribe families in northern Karnataka, India.
  • Samvedana Plus intervention briefs Violence in the intimate relationships of female sex workers increases their vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. An intervention and evaluation study in northern Karnataka, India, Samvedana Plus seeks to understand and address this form of violence and HIV...
  • Policy: Map the interactions between Sustainable Development Goals An article published in Nature proposes a framework for identifying linkages between targets of various sustainable development goals (SDGs). The authors argue that tackling the SDGs separately is an approach that may lead to detrimental outcomes.