What Works evidence review: Preventing violence against women and girls with disabilities in lower and middle income countries

Disability Evidence Brief.pdf

Women and girls with disabilities are at increased risk of violence, abuse, neglect, maltreatment, and exploitation both because of their gender and their disabilities. Women with disabilities are at least twice as likely as nondisabled women to be victims of rape, sexual abuse and intimate partner violence (IPV). While all children with disabilities are at a higher risk for various forms of violence when compared to children without disabilities – including sexual violence, disability bullying, and physical violence – girls with disabilities are more likely to experience physical and sexual violence than boys with disabilities .

Experiences of violence by all women and girls can have significant, long-term impact on both their physical and mental health. Thus, the relationship between disability and violence is reciprocal as disability enhances the risk of violence, while violence itself can lead to (or increase the severity of) disabilities.

Cycle of violence and disability - from WhatWorks Evidence review

This brief, from the What Works to Prevent Violence Programme, discusses the evidence base on preventing violence against women and girls with disabilities in lower and middle-income countries. It covers:

  • The importance of social context for understanding disability and vulnerability to violence
  • Barriers in built and structural environments
  • Discrimination, dependence, and social barriers
  • Intersections of disability, gender and violence
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Expanding the evidence base on preventing violence against women and girls with disabilities in LMICs
  • Recommendations for disability inclusive research, evaluations, and violence prevention programmes

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