Reducing intimate partner violence and increasing condom usage in the HIV/STI response: a facilitator's guide for training female sex workers

Research has shown a significant link between non-use of condoms, HIV and gender-based violence. Sex workers’ ability to negotiate condom use with intimate partners (IPs) is severely compromised by several factors that include their emotional and sometimes financial dependence on the partners, inequitable power relationships with their IPs, violence in their intimate relationships, social norms defining their acceptable behaviour and expectations around fidelity. These factors increase their vulnerability to HIV.

This guide is written to help facilitators cum counsellors to:

Using peer group reflection to empower sex workers to reduce violence and increase condom use with their intimate partner relationships

This poster was presented at the 12th International Conference on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific, 12-14 March in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

You can find other related resources on our Samvedana Plus project page.

Mental health mediates violence and condom use among women in sex work with intimate partners in Karnataka, India

This poster was presented at the 12th International Conference on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific, 12-14 March in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

You can find other related resources on our Samvedana Plus project page.

What do we (really) know about VAW and HIV risk?

Please join us for a free webinar on Tuesday 29 November 2016.

Please join us for a free webinar on Tuesday 29 November 2016.

Global implementation of PrEP as part of combination HIV prevention – Unsolved challenges

A special JIAS supplement was launched at R4P in Chicago.

The Chavan Family

Parental support for education can make all the difference to a girl’s chance of education.

This film – 5 mins, 30 secs long – introduces the Chavan family. Although his own work as a stonemason is tough, Mr Chavan is determined to give his daughters the education they need to get better jobs. He has become a champion of his own daughters staying in school and encourages others to think differently too.

The Samata programme includes many different measures to encourage girls and their families. These include:

The Awadhi Family

A film about efforts to end discrimination against girls, as one family experiences them.

Before screening, you might want to ask the audience if it’s easier for a girl or a boy to complete secondary school – and why.

How can social norms be changed, to improve girls’ options in the future? This 7-minute film provides a useful introduction to discussions about:

Aarti and Bharati

Twin sisters experience the threat of under-age marriage.

Use this short video (4 mins, 30 secs) to start a discussion about:

  • the often-hidden custom of child-marriage
  • the power of social norms that can sustain or challenge harmful practices
  • programmes and services, such as India’s Childline, to prevent abuses

Ask your audience some questions before screening the video. Ask, for example:

Financing the HIV response in sub-Saharan Africa from domestic sources: Moving beyond a normative approach

, ; Financing the HIV response in sub-Saharan Africa from domestic sources: Moving beyond a normative approach

Despite optimism about the end of AIDS, the HIV response requires sustained financing into the future. Given flat-lining international aid, countries' willingness and ability to shoulder this responsibility will be central to access to HIV care. This paper examines the potential to expand public HIV financing, and the extent to which governments have been utilising these options.

The paper highlights how:

Reducing violence and increasing condom use in the intimate partnerships of female sex workers: study protocol for Samvedana Plus, a cluster randomised controlled trial in Karnataka state, south India

, ; Reducing violence and increasing condom use in the intimate partnerships of female sex workers: study protocol for Samvedana Plu

Female sex workers (FSWs) are at increased risk of HIV and STIs compared to women in the general population, and frequently experience violence in their working and domestic lives from a variety of perpetrators, which can enhance this risk. While progress has been made in addressing violence by police and clients, little work has been done to understand and prevent violence by intimate partners (IPs) among FSW populations.

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